Tag Archives: blue

Baby Blue Vest

18 Aug

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My nephew will be born in the next couple of weeks. Even though babies can’t comprehend the time and effort that goes into hand-knit items, I hope all the affection I poured into these stitches will sink into his soft little body and help him know he is loved.

The pattern, Viggo, is for a little striped vest, but I love this so much more. The main yarn is Araucania Lontue, a thick/thin light fingering weight cotton/linen blend. It’s not as soft as most baby yarns due to the linen content, but it will get softer with wear and washing, and as a vest it will be worn over shirts or onesies. Check out more technical details on my Ravelry page.

I got this yarn on closeout when one of my local yarn shops decided to shut down, and I used about half of one skein for this vest. I will definitely use the remaining yarn to make another baby vest or sweater, because I think this is too cute.

It’s not often that I don’t want to let go of a knitted item, but I’m sorry to see this leave. I won’t be around to see my nephew while he’s a little babe (they live several states away) so I won’t even get to enjoy cuddling him while he wears this. But I guess that’s what you get when you live away from your family.

This also makes a great companion for the striped bonnet I knit this spring.

5

Little things

5 Jul

My Rainbow Trout cowl was knit with hand-dyed and solid cotton.

Merit Badges are a quick and easy way to bust stash yarn and show your knitter pride.

Work continues on the super-secret birthday presents for my parents (only three weeks to go!) but I wanted to update the blog with a few little projects I recently completed. The first is my Rainbow Trout cowl, which I designed myself. The second is a Merit Badge, a great free pattern designed by Amanda Ochocki. I used some leftover hand-dyed sock yarn to make a cute stripey badge. (I did not knit the shrug)

My stash runneth over

7 Jun

I recently helped my good friend Kristine out with the simple task of checking in on her birds while she was out of town. They’re good birds, and her house is on my way to work, so it was truly no problem to do this favor.

Last night Kristine (and the birds!) thanked me with a gift certificate to my favorite local yarn shop! While this was totally unnecessary, I will not turn down yarn and I was touched by the thoughtfulness.

Gift certificates burn a hole in my pocket, so this afternoon I went down to Loopy Knit/Crochet and came out with two bright, electric blue skeins of Cascade Ultra Pima (440 yds total) and a Brittany shawl pin.

Brittany makes beautiful needles and crochet hooks in Northern California using sustainably harvest birch hardwood. I have a few sets of their needles, and the shawl pin looks like a short knitting needle. I love it!

As soon as I free up some knitting time for myself I’m going to make something gorgeous to go around my neck with this yarn. It might be a scarf or a shawl or a cowl, but whatever it is, it will be beautiful.

Thank you, Kristine!

Reclaimed

19 May

When I first started knitting I bought a lot of nice yarn and knit a lot of mediocre stuff that I never wore. These items (mostly scarves because they’re easy) have been hanging around the house staring at me, wondering why they never see the light of day. It’s a good question, so I decided to do something about it.

This led to a lot of hunting down these items, unweaving ends, and ripping it all out. At the end I had quite a few balls of gorgeous worsted-weight cotton waiting to become something beautiful that will actually be worn.

Some of this yarn is a hand-dyed cotton of unknown origin and some is Blue Sky Alpacas Worsted Cotton. Generally soft yarns like the Blue Sky Alpacas get really fuzzy when ripped out, but it all still looked great, so I started looking for new patterns.

After cruising Ravelry for days and checking out bags, scarves, shawls, hats and mittens, I just wasn’t happy with any patterns. I realized it was time to take things into my own hands.

Taking two of the colors of my reclaimed yarn I’ve started working on Rainbow Trout, a cushy cowl with alternating stockinette and garter stitch. The simple stitch pattern will highlight the beauty of the yarn and make for an easy side project. The name is inspired by the colors of the yarn, which remind me of the rainbow trout that fill Montana’s rivers and streams.

Now I’m just searching for the perfect buttons. I have some ceramic fishies in mind, but we’ll have to wait and see. This project will likely see more wear when autumn hits, but early mornings can still be chilly in Montana, so when this is all finished it may come along on my morning bike rides.

River Ripple Hat Pattern

20 Mar

I’m happy to announce that I’ve added a new free pattern to my site! The River Ripple Hat pattern (available by clicking on the image to the left or visiting the Patterns page) is finally complete!

The idea for this hat has been brewing for a long time. I knew I wanted something featuring garter stitch and cables with a brim worked flat then picked up along the edge.

This yarn was originally meant for a TARDIS hat, but after staring at it for months and using my successful Rose Red hat (knit in the same yarn) as an inspiration, I decided to knit a water-inspired hat for Spring.

This pattern is simple to work if you can knit cables, in-the-round, and take the initiative to find the length and fit that works best for your head. Because the pattern only includes instructions for a standard adult women’s size, a knitter looking to make a smaller or larger version will need to use their own judgement to adjust the gauge. That being said, any intermediate knitter should have not problem following the instructions and chart.

One of my favorite details of this hat, other than the way the simple four-stitch cable *pops* out of the garter-stitch background of the brim, is the fancy rhinestone buckle.

This buckle comes from a vintage sample card my mom bought me at an estate sale years ago. I’ve been looking for reasons to use it forever, and although my husband favored a simple button for the tab, I couldn’t resist adding some sparkle. Besides, this is a classy buckle. In 1951, this buckle cost $8. Calculate inflation into that and I put a shiny, $70 buckle on my hat, which is a testament to just how much I love this hat.

The pattern specifies that you can use any large buckle or button, but I’m so pleased that my hat features a classic detail that has some history. If I weren’t already married I could wear this as my something old and something blue!

I recommend using Blue Sky Alpaca Worsted Cotton in the Mediterranean colorway for this pattern, but any soft worsted-weight yarn with good stitch definition will work.

I hope you enjoy the pattern, and please visit the Ravelry pattern page to post any comments or questions.

I’m still here

19 Mar

I know I’ve been missing for awhile, but that’s because I’ve been knitting some socks and a shawl, and also designing this delightful blue hat. More posts and a pattern coming soon!

Clocks

26 Feb

"Clocks" are a 4-stich cable motif, included down the legs, heels and instep of this sock.

Sock No. 1 of my current project is complete. If I’ve been quiet this week, it’s because I’m having way too much fun knitting these cabled beauties.

Project Details

Clocks Socks

Pattern: Gansey Clock Socks, Ann Budd, Sockupied Fall 2011

Yarn: Berroco Comfort Sock, 50% nylon / 50% acrylic, 447 yds., colorway: Invercargill

Needles: US size 1, DPNs and 32″ circular for some magic-loop. The pattern recommended using US 2 needles for most of the leg, but I have slender ankles and lower legs, so I used US 1 for the whole sock and they fit great.