Tag Archives: cables

Where have I been?

18 Dec

Image

After finishing up the vest and shawl for my parents’ birthdays this summer, I was really burned out. I took a break from knitting heavily, and I took a break from this blog. I have to admit, it was nice to recharge my batteries and get ready to tackle some knitting projects full of love once again.

In the past few months I have completed a sweater for my husband, some hats, a pair of slippers and other small items. It’s been great and relaxing.

Since I’m now knitting more consistently, I’ll get back into posting on this blog as I go. Right now I have two projects on my needles. One, pictured above, is the Baby Aran Bodysuit by Eileen Casey, and another is the Chevron Baby Blanket by Purl Soho.

Hmm… Those projects have something in common, don’t they? Well, the big reveal is:

I’m not pregnant!

Why am I knitting so much baby stuff (not counting the pile of finished projects I have tucked away in a box) if I’m not even pregnant? Call it wishful knitting.

If you’ve stuck around long enough to see me return to the blog, thank you. I hope to share some more pictures and stories with you in the coming months.

Advertisements

The Reveal

30 Jul

My parents visited this past weekend, and I was finally able to give them their birthday gifts. Allow me to present Quill for my mom, and Caldwell for my dad.

Quill, designed by Jared Flood, was published in the 2011 Brooklyn Tweed Spring Thaw collection.

Caldwell, designed by Stephen West, was published in Brooklyn Tweed Wool People Volume 1.

Both of these projects were knit with Knit Picks simply organic cotton – Quill in sport weight, and Caldwell in worsted weight. The colors suit my parents’ wardrobes and personalities, and I feel the patterns complement each other well. I hope they have wonderful knitwear date nights when the weather gets chilly.

Both of these projects were challenging for me in their own ways. Quill is a simple pattern, but it’s huge and requires a lot of time, patience, and blocking with wires. Caldwell is seamed and finished with an i-cord bind off all around. This was a new technique for me and took a lot of time.

I was so pleased that my parents loved their gifts. Their reaction made all of the hard work and long nights worth it. I unfortunately forgot to pull the beautiful photo of both of them wearing their gifts off my mom’s camera before they left, but perhaps I can get it on the blog later.

Additionally, my dad added a wonderful treat to my mom’s gift and bought her a silver shawl pin that features oak leaves, one of my mom’s favorite motifs. All in all, I think she had a beautiful 50th birthday, and my dad will have a great 62nd next weekend.

But you know, my parents weren’t the only ones who received gifts this weekend. I got some new toys, too! Most notably, my mom brought me some gorgeous rosewood Knitter’s Pride Cubic DPNs. These square needles are ergonomic, strong, and create more uniform stitches.

The GNP socks are still in progress. I’ve missed the deadline for the competition, but hopefully they can still make it up to Whitefish in time for the auction.

Because I just started a new job (which I love!) and had family visit, my lofty goals of completing my GNP socks and competing in the Ravellenic Games (formerly the Ravelympics) were not realized. I did, however, cast on a sweater with the yarn I had set aside for the competition.

Great things start with small beginnings. That’s what I’m going to keep telling myself.

This little sleeve will eventually be the Agnes Pullover from the latest issue of Knitscene. I don’t normally purchase that magazine, but just about every pattern in the fall issue is gorgeous, especially Agnes.

I had hoped to have some more impressive in-progress projects to share right now, but I am so happy I took time to relax and enjoy my family’s visit. My parents and aunt don’t get to come out here often, and the Ravellenic Games aren’t a good reason to ignore my family.

Notes

  • Quill is a traditional Shetland hap shawl.
  • The buttons featured on the Caldwell vest are apple wood and purchased from Woods of Narnia on Etsy.

River Ripple Hat Pattern

20 Mar

I’m happy to announce that I’ve added a new free pattern to my site! The River Ripple Hat pattern (available by clicking on the image to the left or visiting the Patterns page) is finally complete!

The idea for this hat has been brewing for a long time. I knew I wanted something featuring garter stitch and cables with a brim worked flat then picked up along the edge.

This yarn was originally meant for a TARDIS hat, but after staring at it for months and using my successful Rose Red hat (knit in the same yarn) as an inspiration, I decided to knit a water-inspired hat for Spring.

This pattern is simple to work if you can knit cables, in-the-round, and take the initiative to find the length and fit that works best for your head. Because the pattern only includes instructions for a standard adult women’s size, a knitter looking to make a smaller or larger version will need to use their own judgement to adjust the gauge. That being said, any intermediate knitter should have not problem following the instructions and chart.

One of my favorite details of this hat, other than the way the simple four-stitch cable *pops* out of the garter-stitch background of the brim, is the fancy rhinestone buckle.

This buckle comes from a vintage sample card my mom bought me at an estate sale years ago. I’ve been looking for reasons to use it forever, and although my husband favored a simple button for the tab, I couldn’t resist adding some sparkle. Besides, this is a classy buckle. In 1951, this buckle cost $8. Calculate inflation into that and I put a shiny, $70 buckle on my hat, which is a testament to just how much I love this hat.

The pattern specifies that you can use any large buckle or button, but I’m so pleased that my hat features a classic detail that has some history. If I weren’t already married I could wear this as my something old and something blue!

I recommend using Blue Sky Alpaca Worsted Cotton in the Mediterranean colorway for this pattern, but any soft worsted-weight yarn with good stitch definition will work.

I hope you enjoy the pattern, and please visit the Ravelry pattern page to post any comments or questions.

Clocks

26 Feb

"Clocks" are a 4-stich cable motif, included down the legs, heels and instep of this sock.

Sock No. 1 of my current project is complete. If I’ve been quiet this week, it’s because I’m having way too much fun knitting these cabled beauties.

Project Details

Clocks Socks

Pattern: Gansey Clock Socks, Ann Budd, Sockupied Fall 2011

Yarn: Berroco Comfort Sock, 50% nylon / 50% acrylic, 447 yds., colorway: Invercargill

Needles: US size 1, DPNs and 32″ circular for some magic-loop. The pattern recommended using US 2 needles for most of the leg, but I have slender ankles and lower legs, so I used US 1 for the whole sock and they fit great.

An early resolution

18 Dec

When I started this blog last spring, I really wanted to stick with it. I love knitting. I love writing. I love having a web presence that helps me share my newest knits and keep my projects organized.

However, I failed. Despite my mild efforts, I slipped away from blogging, and the longer it had been since my last post, the less likely I was to sit down and get going again. It would mean acknowledging my failure. Which I am now doing.

So, on that note, I am kicking off a 2012 resolution early and restarting my blog.

To catch you up on some of the things I’ve been doing for the past few months, here are a couple photos:

Eugenia Mittens

These Eugenia Mittens have kept my fingers very toasty as the Montana frost gains ground.

 

The mittens above were a weekend project that has paid off very well. Montana gets cold in winter. Can you believe that? And even though it’s been a wonderfully mild winter, the mornings and nights are quite nippy, and these mittens have been my saving grace while scraping my windshield. The pattern is Eugenia’s Mittens (Ravelry link) and the yarn is Berroco Comfort Worsted in Coffeeberry.

I don’t have a ton of pictures of my knitting projects from the past few months, but I have been working on some very important Christmas knitting. Among which are some “Julekuler” – also known as Christmas Balls – from the Arne & Carlos book “55 Christmas Balls to Knit”. Arne & Carlos are Norwegian knitting dynamos, and this book features ornaments with traditional and contemporary Fair Isle-technique patterns.

Christmas Balls

Three of my Julekuler all in a row.

 

Some of these balls have stayed at my house (like the Griz ball, designed by me with the logo of my alma mater) and some have gone to other homes as Christmas gifts. I will continue to make these balls as the year goes so that many more can be sent to friends and family next year. Each ball takes an afternoon or evening to make, so they’re a great quick knit.

I have more pictures and updates coming in the next few days, including: Single socks waiting for mates, Christmas gift teasers, stash yarns and my devious plans for them.

To everyone who read my blog before, and everyone who is reading this now, thank you! I hope to be better this year!