Tag Archives: stripes

Lunchtime Update

3 Jan
The Chevron Baby Blanket by Purl Soho.

The Chevron Baby Blanket by Purl Soho.

I have completed the knitting on my Chevron Baby Blanket. I’m totally smitten with this afghan and I wish it were my size. It could make a great lap blanket, but I think I’d like to save it for a baby.

I say I’m finished with the knitting because I’d like to line the wrong side of the afghan with some cotton fabric. This will make it even warmer and will help keep the ends from unweaving as the blanket gets washed repeatedly.

I think this project is great for both beginners or advanced knitters. The stitch pattern was easy to memorize and the neat design is a great payoff for a new knitter, while the bulky-weight guage offers fast satisfaction to a seasoned knitter who’s burned out on a shawl or more complicated patterns.

This pattern called for seven skeins of Blue Sky Alpacas Worsted Cotton, which I have used on several occassions. However, this yarn is a bit pricey and the afghan would have cost more than $100 if I’d used it. I opted for Knit Picks Simply Cotton Worsted, which has been discontinued and was on clearance. In total, I paid $21 for the yarn (plus a little stash white cotton I had sitting around.)

The only adjustments I made to the pattern had to do with how much yarn I had. The pattern calls for 20 rows of each color (10 garter ridges), but I wasn’t sure I had enough yarn when I started, so I did 18 rows of each color. To make up for the lost length I added the white cotton stripe in the middle, and my afghan is just four rows longer than it would be if I’d followed the pattern.

I will definitely make this afghan again the future, though I’ll have to find some new yarn. I love the organic cotton feel, but Knit Picks Comfy Worsted (cotton/acrylic) or even the pricey Blue Sky Alpacas Worsted Cotton would be great choices.

I did estimate incorrectly on the amount of yarn I had, so I have leftovers of each color. I think I’ll make a matching bonnet!

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Stripes

22 Dec

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I tried to post this photo another way, and it didn’t work. I’m continuing to make progress on my Chevron Baby Blanket, and every stripe I add makes it even prettier. After the white comes two greens and a dark gray. I can’t wait to finish this up. The final size will be about 2’x3′ and will weight nearly 2 lbs. I wish I could shrink down to baby size so I could cuddle under it.

The Reveal

30 Jul

My parents visited this past weekend, and I was finally able to give them their birthday gifts. Allow me to present Quill for my mom, and Caldwell for my dad.

Quill, designed by Jared Flood, was published in the 2011 Brooklyn Tweed Spring Thaw collection.

Caldwell, designed by Stephen West, was published in Brooklyn Tweed Wool People Volume 1.

Both of these projects were knit with Knit Picks simply organic cotton – Quill in sport weight, and Caldwell in worsted weight. The colors suit my parents’ wardrobes and personalities, and I feel the patterns complement each other well. I hope they have wonderful knitwear date nights when the weather gets chilly.

Both of these projects were challenging for me in their own ways. Quill is a simple pattern, but it’s huge and requires a lot of time, patience, and blocking with wires. Caldwell is seamed and finished with an i-cord bind off all around. This was a new technique for me and took a lot of time.

I was so pleased that my parents loved their gifts. Their reaction made all of the hard work and long nights worth it. I unfortunately forgot to pull the beautiful photo of both of them wearing their gifts off my mom’s camera before they left, but perhaps I can get it on the blog later.

Additionally, my dad added a wonderful treat to my mom’s gift and bought her a silver shawl pin that features oak leaves, one of my mom’s favorite motifs. All in all, I think she had a beautiful 50th birthday, and my dad will have a great 62nd next weekend.

But you know, my parents weren’t the only ones who received gifts this weekend. I got some new toys, too! Most notably, my mom brought me some gorgeous rosewood Knitter’s Pride Cubic DPNs. These square needles are ergonomic, strong, and create more uniform stitches.

The GNP socks are still in progress. I’ve missed the deadline for the competition, but hopefully they can still make it up to Whitefish in time for the auction.

Because I just started a new job (which I love!) and had family visit, my lofty goals of completing my GNP socks and competing in the Ravellenic Games (formerly the Ravelympics) were not realized. I did, however, cast on a sweater with the yarn I had set aside for the competition.

Great things start with small beginnings. That’s what I’m going to keep telling myself.

This little sleeve will eventually be the Agnes Pullover from the latest issue of Knitscene. I don’t normally purchase that magazine, but just about every pattern in the fall issue is gorgeous, especially Agnes.

I had hoped to have some more impressive in-progress projects to share right now, but I am so happy I took time to relax and enjoy my family’s visit. My parents and aunt don’t get to come out here often, and the Ravellenic Games aren’t a good reason to ignore my family.

Notes

  • Quill is a traditional Shetland hap shawl.
  • The buttons featured on the Caldwell vest are apple wood and purchased from Woods of Narnia on Etsy.

Too bright!

27 Feb

Last week I finished a pair of socks for my 8-year-old stepdaughter, and although I wanted to blog about it, I ran into a little problem.

These socks – which I call Sophia’s Rugby Socks because of the stripes – are impossible to photograph, at least with my dinky camera. They are bright raspberry pink and royal purple in color, and although my eye can process this vibrant pairing, nearly every photo I took of the socks is an absolute mess.

Here are a couple that sort of turned out:

One of these photos is taken in natural light, and the other with artificial night in the evening. They both totally blew out the sensor of my camera. You’ll just have to take my word for it on the color. It actually looks pretty cool, and Sophia really likes them.

One other thing you might notice about these socks is that they don’t match. This is because if I’ve learned one thing about my stepdaughter it’s that she doesn’t like to wear matching socks. It’s a constant battle to get her to keep her socks in pairs, and then follow through with actually wearing them as pairs.

I’ve decided to temporarily roll with this quirk and rather than make her a matching pair of socks, she has a new pair that is coordinating. She really brightened up when she saw that they socks don’t match, so I think I made the right call.

These are knit with a DK-weight yarn (nice and thick for kid activities) and feature short-row heels. This is the first time I’ve used short-row heels (not pictured, unfortunately) but I think in the future I will spread them out across more of the stitches. The heels seem a bit short compared to my usual flap heel, and I only  knit across 50% of the stitches. I’ve read online that 60% of the stitches can be knit for a short-row heel, which seems like it would work much better.

Project Details

Sophia’s Rugby Socks

Pattern: I made it up as I went!

Yarn: Berroco Comfort DK, 185 yds., colorways: Purple and Teaberry

Needles: US 2 32″ circular

Clocks

26 Feb

"Clocks" are a 4-stich cable motif, included down the legs, heels and instep of this sock.

Sock No. 1 of my current project is complete. If I’ve been quiet this week, it’s because I’m having way too much fun knitting these cabled beauties.

Project Details

Clocks Socks

Pattern: Gansey Clock Socks, Ann Budd, Sockupied Fall 2011

Yarn: Berroco Comfort Sock, 50% nylon / 50% acrylic, 447 yds., colorway: Invercargill

Needles: US size 1, DPNs and 32″ circular for some magic-loop. The pattern recommended using US 2 needles for most of the leg, but I have slender ankles and lower legs, so I used US 1 for the whole sock and they fit great.