Tag Archives: hat

River Ripple Hat Pattern

20 Mar

I’m happy to announce that I’ve added a new free pattern to my site! The River Ripple Hat pattern (available by clicking on the image to the left or visiting the Patterns page) is finally complete!

The idea for this hat has been brewing for a long time. I knew I wanted something featuring garter stitch and cables with a brim worked flat then picked up along the edge.

This yarn was originally meant for a TARDIS hat, but after staring at it for months and using my successful Rose Red hat (knit in the same yarn) as an inspiration, I decided to knit a water-inspired hat for Spring.

This pattern is simple to work if you can knit cables, in-the-round, and take the initiative to find the length and fit that works best for your head. Because the pattern only includes instructions for a standard adult women’s size, a knitter looking to make a smaller or larger version will need to use their own judgement to adjust the gauge. That being said, any intermediate knitter should have not problem following the instructions and chart.

One of my favorite details of this hat, other than the way the simple four-stitch cable *pops* out of the garter-stitch background of the brim, is the fancy rhinestone buckle.

This buckle comes from a vintage sample card my mom bought me at an estate sale years ago. I’ve been looking for reasons to use it forever, and although my husband favored a simple button for the tab, I couldn’t resist adding some sparkle. Besides, this is a classy buckle. In 1951, this buckle cost $8. Calculate inflation into that and I put a shiny, $70 buckle on my hat, which is a testament to just how much I love this hat.

The pattern specifies that you can use any large buckle or button, but I’m so pleased that my hat features a classic detail that has some history. If I weren’t already married I could wear this as my something old and something blue!

I recommend using Blue Sky Alpaca Worsted Cotton in the Mediterranean colorway for this pattern, but any soft worsted-weight yarn with good stitch definition will work.

I hope you enjoy the pattern, and please visit the Ravelry pattern page to post any comments or questions.

I’m still here

19 Mar

I know I’ve been missing for awhile, but that’s because I’ve been knitting some socks and a shawl, and also designing this delightful blue hat. More posts and a pattern coming soon!

New Look, New Hat

30 Jan

This tam was the first project I've ever completed using beading.

This week I used a new knitting technique and gave my blog a makeover. I’m slow to accept change most of the time, but this is just refreshing.

The new knitting technique was part of my Garden Party Lights Tam, made from the Holiday Lights Tam pattern published in Interweave Knits Winter 2011.

Though “Holiday Lights” was a very fitting name for the golden hat featured in the magazine, I felt that my green-and-blue version, knit on the cusp of spring, better represents a sort of garden-party, crocus-bud kind of feeling.

Using the beading technique for the first time was interesting, but very easy to get the hang of. This technique involved stringing beads onto your yarn before knitting, then placing the beads on certain stitches for the pattern. This particular hat highlights the beads using a slipped-stitch bow pattern, which to me makes the beads look like little droplets of water sliding down a green bulb.

The yarn is Cascade Ultra Pima (DK / 220 yards) in the Olive colorway, and has been hanging around my stash for nearly a year now. I purchased it at Loopy Knit/Crochet in Missoula, but haven’t been pleased with any particular pattern I tried for it. I knew I wanted to use it for a beret or tam, an after several non-starts, this pattern seemed like the perfect fit. The yardage was also perfect for this project, and I have a little chunk left over that will go into my hexipuff stash.

The beads were purchased at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and are Blue Moon 6/0 seed beads in a blue/turquoise color. For less than $3 I was able to buy enough beads for two hats, with each hat requiring 360 beads.

This hat will not be staying with me, although I hope to knit one for myself in colors more to my taste. This particular hat will be arriving in the mailbox of some lucky lady within the next week, and I hope she loves it.

As far as the new look for my blog, I wanted to spice things up a bit and draw more attention to some of the extra links I provide. I hope to add more original designs to my Patterns page, and the links under More Blogs are my favorite source of humor and inspiration.

I hope you all like the new look! Coming up: The Scent of Lavender.

Rose Red

22 Jan

This hat is a bit slouchy, and the cable decreases to the center.

I’ve had garter stitch on my mind lately. Garter stitch is the most basic pattern in knitting, and is usually the first thing any fledgling knitter learns. The simplicity of knitting every row, front and back, to create a fabric with little horizontal bumpy ridges, is the equivalent of crawling when it comes to knitting techniques. I believe that because of this, many knitters are happy to leave garter stitch behind as their skills develop, and will go years choosing patterns with little or no garter stitch. Garter stitch is just for beginners, right?

Wrong.

After spending a few years leaving garter stitch in the dust, I can’t get it out of my mind. Because it’s so simple, it gives patterns a classic, almost retro feel. The texture is soft and stretchy, and the little ridges can feel delightful against your skin. Just about every pattern I’ve been interested in lately has at least a little garter stitch.

In this garter-stitch craze, I stumbled across the Rosebud hat pattern by Brooklyn Tweed designer Jared Flood, and is part of the Brooklyn Tweed Fall 2011 design line. I knit Jared Flood’s Cobblestone sweater pattern for my dad for Christmas (another pattern using garter stitch!), and was very impressed with the quality of the pattern’s publication. I was pleased again with the simple but detailed instructions included for the Rosebud hat.

From start to finish, my Rose Red hat (named for my favorite fairytale character from my childhood) took only two days and about 140 yds of the Blue Sky Alpacas Worsted Cotton my mom gave me for Christmas. The colorway is True Red, and I think it suits this pattern perfectly.

Rose Red is slouchy enough to be a stylish accessory, but fits perfectly to keep my ears warm.

I originally planned on knitting the longer, slouchy version of the hat, but my yarn ran out too early. However, I have a small head, and the smaller size fits me perfectly with a little bit of slouch in the back.

Next to my TARDIS socks, this is probably my favorite knitted item. I think the pattern, yarn and color are perfect, and I’m so excited to wear my new hat everywhere.

I would recommend any Brooklyn Tweed pattern. The quality of design is fantastic, and every item looks like a modern, stylish take on a classic theme – like a long, meandering cable braid in a sea of garter stitch.